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Controlling Urine pH

By

Patricia M. Dowling

, DVM, MSc, DACVIM, DACVCP, Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan

Last full review/revision Feb 2015 | Content last modified Feb 2015

The ideal urine pH should be 7.0–7.5 in dogs and 6.3–6.6 in cats. If the urine pH remains below these values after diet modification, potassium citrate at 80–150 mg/kg/day, PO, divided bid-tid, can be given to increase the pH. Ammonium chloride (200 mg/kg/day, PO, divided tid) and dl-methionine (1,000–1,500 mg/cat/day, PO) are the urinary acidifiers of choice. Chronic urine acidification, and ensuing acidosis, can be harmful and should not be instituted without complete evaluation of the animal.

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