MSD Manual

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Feed Additives Included for Non-Nutrient Benefits

Feed Additives Included for Non-Nutrient Benefits

Additive

Effect

Feeding Rate

High Probability of Positive Economic Return in General Feeding Situations

Monensin sodium

Increased feed efficiency, improved energy metabolism

11–22 mg/ton complete feed

185–660 mg/day (lactating cows)

115–410 mg/day (dry cows)

Sodium bicarbonate and other buffers

Improved feed consumption, stabilization of rumen pH, increased butterfat production

0.75% of dry matter

Yeast culture

Improved feed consumption, improved fiber digestion

Variable, consult manufacturer directions

High Probability of Positive Economic Return in Specific Problem Situations

Strong anion additives for prepartum diets

Improved calcium homeostasis, milk fever prevention

Variable, calculate DCADa, monitor urine pH and dry-matter intake, late gestation only; do not use in springing heifers

Rumen protected choline

Improved lipid metabolism, fatty liver and ketosis prevention, improved metabolic status

60 g/day (>12.9 g choline ion) in late gestation and early lactation

Propylene glycol

Improved energy metabolism, ketosis prevention

300–500 mL/day, late gestation and early lactation only; more nutritionally effective when drenched rather than fed

Niacin

Improved lipid metabolism, improved rumen fermentation, increased feed efficiency and milk component concentrations

6–12 g/day, include protected and unprotected sources

Biotin

Improved hoof health, keratin structure, reduced hoof disorders

20 g/day throughout lactation; 10–20 mg/day gestation and 10–20 mg/day for heifers >15 months

aDCAD (dietary cation-anion difference) defined as (Na + K) – (Cl + S) in mEq/kg units